GF Haddad states Shah Ismail is free of blame on the issue of Sarf Himmah

December 18, 2013

wa `alaykum salam,
Those who painstakingly gathered and translated the apologetic evidence in defense of Shah Ismail deserve credit because they have brought to light material from the sources that was unavailable before, and my feeling is they have tried to be fair in their translations. After a quick perusal of a few issues I am satisfied that on the one hand Shah Ismail is blameless on the issue of sarf al himma, but not on that of ‘mixing with the earth’ despite Mawlana Gangohi’s attempt to make it sound acceptable to use an ambiguous expression. Prophetic Attributes are tawqifi and here as elsewhere we stand with athar. Nor is Shah Ismail’s position that more Muhammads can be created other than tanqis of Prophet posing as ta’zim of Allah Most High. Those who ask for such discussions must therefore sift the chaff from the good and give each its due. In the end we repeat it is best to leave it alone, make peace, worship Allah and bless the Prophet.

Hajj Gibril Haddad

http://eshaykh.com/doctrine/deobandi-explanation-of-controversial-passages/

As stated by the Raza Khanis, each and every accusation they hurled at Shah Ismail contained “kufr” so we ask the Barelwis: will you declare GF Haddad a deviant for his defense of Shah Ismail on the sarf-e himmat issue? The lie that thinking about the Prophet is worse than thinking about a donkey can be read on every Barelwi website and heard in every Barelwi mosque. Oh Barelwis! Do you not fear Allah!


The Ruling in the Hanafi Madhhab of Persistence on a Mustahabb Practice in a Specific Form

December 18, 2013

 

Always Shaking Hands after the Congregational Fard Prayers

Ibn ‘Ābidīn al-Shāmī (d. 1252 H) writes in his Radd al-Muhtār:

وقد صرح بعض علمائنا وغيرهم بكراهة المصافحة المعتادة عقب الصلوات مع أن المصافحة سنة، وما ذاك إلا لكونها لم تؤثر في خصوص هذا الموضع فالمواظبة عليها فيه توهم العوام بأنها سنة فيه

“Some of our [Hanafī] scholars and others have stated explicitly the detestability of the customary handshake following the salawāt, although shaking hands is sunnah. And that is only because it has not been transmitted [from the early generations] in this specific place [i.e. after the salawāt] – thus, continuity on it in this [specific place] gives the false impression that it is sunnah therein.” (Radd al-Muhtār, Dār ‘Ālam al-Kutub, 3:141)

Salāt al-Raghā’ib

He continues:

ولذا منعوا عن الاجتماع لصلاة الرغائب التي أحدثها بعض المتعبدين لأنها لم تؤثر على هذه الكيفية في تلك الليالي المخصوصة، وإن كانت الصلاة خير موضوع

“This is why they forbade gathering for Salāt al-Raghā’ib which some worshippers invented because it has not been transmitted in this form in those specific nights, even though Salāh is the best institution.” (ibid.)

Sajdat al-Shukr on a Particular Occasion

Al-Haskafī (d. 1088 H) writes in al-Durr al-Mukhtār:

لكنها تكره بعد الصلاة لأن الجهلة يعتقدونها سنة أو واجبة وكل مباح يؤدي إليه فمكروه

“But it (sajdat al-shukr) is detestable after Salāh because the ignorant believe it is sunnah or wājib (i.e. after Salāh), and every permissible action leading to it is makrūh.” (Al-Durr al-Mukhtar/ Radd al-Muhtār, Dār ‘Ālam al-Kutub, 2:598)

Ibn ‘Ābidīn explains that this statement was transmitted from al-Zāhidī (d. 658 H) in his commentary on Qudūrī.

The karāhah (detestability) mentioned here refers to makrūh tahrīmī (prohibitively disliked) for which a person is sinful, as mentioned by Ibn ‘Ābidīn, quoting Tahtāwī:

 فمكروه الظاهر أنها تحريمية لأنه يدخل فى الدين ما ليس منه ط

“It is apparent that it is makrūh tahrīmī because he inserts into religion what is not from it.”

Imām Burhān al-Dīn al-Hanafī (d. 616 H) writes:

وجه الكراهة على قول النخعي وأبي حنيفة رضي الله عنهما على ما ذكره القدوري أنه لو فعلها من كان منظورا إليه وظن ظان أنه واجب أو سنة متبعة عند حدوث نعمة فقد أدخل فى الدين ما ليس منه وقد قال عليه السلام: من أدخل فى الدين ما ليس منه فهو مكروه

“The reason for the karāhah based on the view of al-Nakha‘ī and Abū Hanīfah (may Allah be pleased with them), according to what al-Qudūrī mentioned, is that if one who was observed (by people) was to practise upon it, and a supposer wrongly imagined that it is sunnah or wājib adhered to at the instance of blessing, then indeed he has inserted into religion what is not from it, and he (upon him peace) said: Whoever inserts into religion what is not from it, it is detestable.” (al-Muhīt al-Burhānī, Dār al-Kutb al-‘Ilmiyah, 5:323)

Fixing a Sūrah to a Rak‘ah

Abū Bakr al-Jassās (d. 370 H) writes in explaining another Hanafī ruling:

قال أبو جعفر: ويكره أن يتخذ شيء من القرآن لشيء من الصلوات

وذلك لأنه لو أبيح ذلك لم يؤمن على مرور الأوقات أن يظنه الناس مسنونا أو واجبا كما قد سبق الآن إلى ظن كثير من الجهال في مثله

“Abu Ja‘far [al-Tahawi] said (quoting the imāms of the Hanafī madhhab): It is makrūh (prohibitively disliked) to adopt a part of the Qur’ān for a specific part of the prayers.

“And that is because if that was to be permitted, it would not be assured that with the passage of time people will believe it is sunnah or wajib; as has occurred today in the understanding of many of the ignorant people in the like of it.” (Sharh Mukhtasar al-Tahawi, Dār al-Sirāj, 8:525)

Note: This was in the 4th Islamic century! How then can we claim our ignorant and common people are immune from this misunderstanding?

Summary

In short, we have two rulings from the founders of the Hanafī madhhab, the basis of the prohibition mentioned in them being that it leads the common and ignorant people to believing that a particular form of an originally acceptable practice is sunnah. These two rulings are: performing sajdat al-shukr on a particular occasion; fixing a sūrah to a particular rak‘ah of Salāh. Moreover, we have the verdict of later Hanafī jurists in a couple of other rulings, based on the same principle. These are: shaking hands persistently after the fard prayers; and Salāt al-Raghā’ib in the fixed way and time it is performed.

All of this points to one conclusion:

In the Hanafī madhhab, repeatedly, persistently and continuously performing a religious practice, originally regarded in the Sharī‘ah as permissible or mustahabb, publically, in a specific manner that has not been transmitted from the Prophet (peace be upon him) or Sahābah, such that a false impression is created in the minds of the ignorant that this particular form (e.g. in terms of its date, procedure) is sunnah or wājib, renders that act prohibitively disliked (makrūh tahrīmī) and the act will be considered an insertion into religion or bid‘ah.

Conclusion

We can safely say, looking at the condition of Barelwis and other psuedo-traditionalists of today, the formal/popular (murawwaj) Mawlid of today, falls in this category, and is hence, makrūh tahrīmī in the Hanafī madhhab.

Also see: https://barelwism.wordpress.com/2013/11/08/consistency-of-the-deobandi-akaabirs-view-on-mawlid/

Update: Someone raised the objection: does not madaris fall under this prohibition, as within them, the mustahabb practice of teaching and learning are repeatedly done in a fixed and regulated way that was not transmitted from the Sahabah? For the perceptive person, the difference between the above examples, including Mawlid, and madaris is clear. The purpose of the regulated and fixed manner of teaching and learning in madaris is purely based on organisational and pragmatic reasons. Common people are not susceptible to the mistaken belief that the madaris themselves are objectives, or desirable elements, of religion. On the other hand, repeated handshakes after Salah, if done openly, commonly and continuously, does make the common people susceptible to the view that to shake hands at that time is a desired practice of religion. Similarly, the Mawlid of Rabi’ al-Awwal makes the common people susceptible to the belief that making this commemoration at that time of the year is superior. This is not only theory; many people really do believe that to celebrate the birth in the month of Rabi al Awwal is more rewarding and superior than doing so in any other time of the year. It is not regarded merely as something organisational. The same applies to the other examples, of fixing a surah to a particular rak’ah of Salah and doing Sajdat al-Shukr after every Fard prayer.


The Fatimid Shi’ahs Originated the Practice of Mawlid in Rabi’ al-Awwal

December 14, 2013

Barelwis claim that pious Sunnis originated the practice of Mawlid in Rabi’ al-Awwal. However, historical reality belies this claim. Although it is difficult to determine precisely when the practice of Mawlid in Rabi’ al-Awwal began, it is known for a fact that it was practised by the Shi’ah Fatimids before the Sunnis. Consider the following evidence:

The Sunni historian, Al-Maqrizī (766 – 845), quotes frequently in his al-Khitat from the book of Jamāl al-Dīn Mūsā ibn al-Ma’mūn (d. 588 H/1192 CE) which mainly consists of a chronicle of the years 514-18 H. In the date 517 H, Ibn al-Ma’mūn mentions that on the 13th of Rabī‘ al-Awwal, the Fātimid ruler distributed charity especially at the shrines of the household  of the Prophet (peace be upon him) and hosted a celebration of his birth. (Khitat, Maktabah Madbula, 2:216)

Al-Maqrizi also transmits in al-Khitat that Ibn al-Tuwayr (525 – 617) mentions a mawlid that happened on 12th Rabi‘ al-Awwal during the Fātimid reign in Egypt in which charity was distributed, there was Qur’an recital at the Azhar Mosque and a sermon on the Prophetic birth. (Khitat, Maktabah Madbula, 2:217-8) The Fātimid dynasty in Egypt fell at about 560 H.

Download Khitat from here.

All recorded Sunni Mawlids take place after these Fatimid Mawlids. Hence, based on historical verification, it was the Shi’ahs that innovated the celebration of Mawlid in Rabi’ al-Awwal. And it would not be farfetched to suggest that the Shi’ah celebrations inspired the later Sunni celebrations.